Virtual Library

The BIOFUND Virtual Library is an online archive of information on Mozambique’s biodiversity, organized along the lines suggested by the Convention on Biodiversity’s Clearing House Mechanism. The Virtual Library will strive to make available all the documents, studies, reports, articles, educational and communications materials, maps and digital files that have been produced, to serve as a repository of our collective institutional memory as a conservation community. The usefulness of the Virtual Library will improve the more we share amongst ourselves. If you have any materials that are not currently part of the Virtual Library, please click on "Add Document" and become a contributor.

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Protected Areas

Title Author Year of Publication
The potential of wild edible mushrooms in the miombo woodlands of the Selous-Niassa wildlife Corridor for the livehood improvement of the local communityUrs Bloesch & Frank Mbago2008


Niassa












English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


Niassa National Reserve

The potential of wild edible mushrooms in the miombo woodlands of the Selous-Niassa wildlife Corridor for the livehood improvement of the local community
Wild edible mushroom value chain for improved livelihoods in Southern Highlands of TanzaniaBaraka Luca Chelela, Musa Chacha and Athanasia Matemu2014


N/A






American Journal of Research Communication


A survey was conducted to assess mycological knowledge and socio-economic benefits along the wild edible mushrooms value chain among Benna and Hehe ethnic groups in the Southern Highlands of Tanzania. The mushroom hunters, collectors, processors and retailers from the local communities in Njombe and Iringa regions were interviewed. The information on indigenous mycological knowledge, collecting and retailing of wild edible mushrooms in Benna and Hehe communities were gathered. The wild edible mushrooms were collected in the Miombo woodland surrounding six villages during rainy season in January 2014. From the survey, mushroom collection and selling was gender oriented dominated by women at 70% and 93.5% respectively. Moreover, it was fou...




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Wild edible mushroom value chain for improved livelihoods in Southern Highlands of Tanzania
How effective are the protected areas of East Africa?Jason Riggio, Andrew P. Jacobson, Robert J. Hijmans, Tim Caro2019


N/A


doi.org/10.1016/j.gecco.2019.e00573




Global Ecology and Conservation


Protected areas are the cornerstone of in situ conservation and their effective management is critical for maintaining biodiversity in the long term. In East Africa (Burundi, Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania and Uganda) there are 1,776 protected areas (including 186 “strict” protected areas with IUCN management categories I through IV) covering more than 27% of its terrestrial area. Here we document the extent to which East African protected areas encompass ecoregions and endemic terrestrial vertebrate taxa, and using new land conversion data derived from medium to high spatial resolution satellite images, we assess how they have been encroached upon by agriculture and other land use. We find that East African protected areas cover 86% of...




English


No Restrictions


General


Peer-reviewed article


Protected Areas


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

How effective are the protected areas of East Africa?
Fencing Africa’s protected areas: Costs, benefits, and management issuesAdam Pekor, Jennifer R.B. Miller, Michael V. Flyman, Samuel Kasik, M. Kristina Kesch, Susan M. Miller, Kenneth Uiseb, Vincent van der Mervej, Peter A. Lindsey2019


N/A


doi.org/10.1016/j.biocon.2018.10.030




Biological Conservation


The fencing of protected areas (PAs) is highly controversial, and much remains unknown about the associated financial, ecological, and social impacts. We surveyed experts on 63 fenced and 121 unfenced PAs across 23 African countries to assess the advantages and drawbacks of fencing. Where fences exist, they are largely supported and widely viewed as effective at demarcating PA boundaries and mitigating human-wildlife conflicts. However, most fences were insufficiently funded, which limited their ability to contain conflict-prone species like elephants and lions. Fences were also frequently vandalised and caused numerous conflicts with local communities. We documented for the first time the distribution of and support for fencing in PAs...




English


No Restrictions


General


Peer-reviewed article


Protected Areas


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Fencing Africa’s protected areas: Costs, benefits, and management issues
Does traditional and advanced guarding reduce crop losses due to wildlife? A comparative analysis from Africa and AsiaEva M. Grossa, Bibhuti P. Lahkar, Naresh Subedi, Vincent R. Nyirenda, Laly L. Lichtenfeld, Oliver Jakoby2019


N/A






Journal for Nature Conservation


Crop damage caused by herbivorous wildlife species on farms located within conservation landscapes, is a driver of human-wildlife conflict (HWC). Guarding of farms, whereby farmers spend the night out in the fields, in areas adjacent to protected areas is, therefore, very common in many African and Asian countries. Furthermore, guarding is often combined with other crop protection measures, but little is known about the efficacy of these measures. We examined the effect that different traditional and advanced crop protection measures (active and passive guarding strategies, barriers and combinations of measures) had on the magnitude of damaged crops. For this, we examined the cost of crop damage caused by a total of 20 wildlife species...




English


No Restrictions


General


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Does traditional and advanced guarding reduce crop losses due to wildlife? A comparative analysis from Africa and Asia
Rapid Assessment and Prioritization of Protected Area Management (RAPPAM) MethodologyErvin J2003


N/A






WWF






English


No Restrictions


General


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Protected Areas


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Rapid Assessment and Prioritization of Protected Area Management (RAPPAM) Methodology
AUTOMATIC TYPE CLASSIFICATION AND SPEAKER IDENTIFICATION OF AFRICAN ELEPHANT VOCALIZATIONSPatrick J. Clemins & Michael T. Johnson2012


N/A






Animal Behavio


This paper presents systems for automatically classifying elephant vocalizations by type and for identifying the speaker of a given vocalization. The method applies techniques from the speech processing field, with modifications, to elephant vocalizations. The features used for classification are 12 Mel-Frequency Cepstral Coefficients computed using a chirp Z-transform to interpolate among the lower frequencies. A Hidden Markov Model is trained for each type of vocalization and vocalizations are classified using leave-one-out verification. Using this system, initial classification accuracies of 77.0% for type classification and 72.2% for speaker identification resulted. These systems represent the initial stages of a universal analysis...




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

AUTOMATIC TYPE CLASSIFICATION AND SPEAKER IDENTIFICATION OF AFRICAN ELEPHANT VOCALIZATIONS
SURVEY PAPER ON ELEPHANT TRACKING USING ACOUSTIC SENSORKanchana.V2016


N/A






International Journal of Scientific Development and Research


Rail Elephant Conflict (REC) has been rise in the various regions in India and across the world. Large numbers of elephant where died in train accident .Tracking of elephant is difficult due to their size and nature of movement. By using acoustic sensor it helps to track the elephant vocalization. Acoustic sensor deal with existing methodologies through their effectiveness and accuracy in monitoring elephant sound without cause any harm to them .while, at the same time, helping the elephant from death. These papers address the survey of elephant tracking.




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Traditional Knowledge, Innovations and Practices


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

SURVEY PAPER ON ELEPHANT TRACKING USING ACOUSTIC SENSOR
Tackling routes to coexistence Human elephant conflict in sub Saharan AfricaEva M. Gross2019


N/A












English


No Restrictions


General


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Community Use of Biodiversity


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Tackling routes to coexistence Human elephant conflict in sub Saharan Africa
A MARKET ASSESSMENT OF THE HONEY INDUSTRY IN SOFALA PROVINCEBrooke Bush2010


Sofala












English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

A MARKET ASSESSMENT OF THE HONEY INDUSTRY IN SOFALA PROVINCE
Household Vulnerability and Transformability in Limpopo National ParkMichel Noteli, Anneli Ekblom2021


Gaza


https://doi.org/10.3390/su13052597




MPDI


In this paper, household vulnerability in Limpopo National Park (LNP) is discussed in relation to interannual climate variability and the effects of the park itself. Climate variability is high and projected to increase with climate change. Meanwhile, the establishment of the national park in 2002 has added both challenges and possibilities. We present the results of livelihood surveys car‐ ried out 2013 and discuss changes taking place in and around the park until present day. Constraints and possibilities for endurability of households are discussed. In conclusion, the vulnerability of the LNP households to climate change is high, but there are a number of strategies in place to ensure endurability. Migrant labour is vital...


2020


English


No Restrictions


General;
Forest Biodiversity;
Mountain Biodiversity;
Other Terrestrial Biodiversity;
Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity;
Marine Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Climate Change and Biodiversity;
Impact Assessment


Limpopo National Park

Household Vulnerability and Transformability in Limpopo National Park
THE MAPUTO BAY ECOSYSTEMSalomão Bandeira, José Paula and Célia Macamo2014


Maputo












English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity;
Threats to Biodiversity


None

THE MAPUTO BAY ECOSYSTEM
A second record of Scolecomorphus kirkii Boulenger, 1883 (Gymnophiona: Scolecomorphidae) for MozambiqueHarith Omar Morgadinho Farooq and Werner Conradie2015


Cabo Delgado;
Nampula;
Niassa








The herpetofauna of northern Mozambique (Nampula, Niassa, and Cabo Degabo Provinces) remains one of the most poorly-known in Africa. This is a consequence of the physical inaccessibility of the region as well as the protracted civil war, which affected the study of many areas. Mozambique is expected to have a large diversity of herpetofauna due to the variety of different habitat types available and the large size (area) of the country. The lack of scientific studies of northern Mozambique has led to widely disparate and inaccurate summaries of the herpetofaunal diversity of the country.




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

A second record of Scolecomorphus kirkii Boulenger, 1883 (Gymnophiona: Scolecomorphidae) for Mozambique
Impactos Socioeconômicos das Plantações Florestais no Niassa, MoçambiqueTeresa Guila Nube, Anadalvo Santos Juazeiro dos Santos, Romano Timofeiczyk Junior, Ivan Crespo Silva2016


Niassa


dx.doi.org/10.1590/2179-8087.038813




Floresta e Ambiente


O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar os impactos socioeconômicos das plantações florestais nas comunidades da província do Niassa, Moçambique. Foram realizadas entrevistas semiestruturadas com 423 chefes de famílias residentes no entorno das empresas florestais. Os dados foram obtidos mediante aplicação de questionários direcionados aos gestores das empresas florestais e membros do governo, e analisados com uso de estatística descritiva, tendo-se considerado o período anterior e posterior à instalação das empresas florestais. Os resultados evidenciaram melhorias de condições de vida das famílias, sobretudo aquelas que têm emprego nas empresas florestais. Porém, a presença das empresas florestais reduziu a dependência e a acessibilidade...


2013-2015


English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


Niassa National Reserve

Impactos Socioeconômicos das Plantações Florestais no Niassa, Moçambique
Study of the distribution, abundance and conservation status of common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibious)BassAir2016


N/A












Portuguese


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Study of the distribution, abundance and conservation status of common hippopotamus (Hippopotamus amphibious)
Assessment of the human wildlife conflict mitigation measures being implemented by the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) Partner CountriesKAZA TFCA Secretariat2016


N/A












English


No Restrictions


General


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Communication and Public Awareness


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Assessment of the human wildlife conflict mitigation measures being implemented by the Kavango-Zambezi Transfrontier Conservation Area (KAZA TFCA) Partner Countries
Socio-economic impacts of private land use investment on ruralcommunities: Industrial forest plantations in Niassa, MozambiqueMaja Bleyera, Matleena Kniiviläb, Paula Horne, Almeida Sitoe, Mário Paulo Falcão2016


Niassa


0.1016/j.landusepol.2015.11.011




Land Use Policy


East Africa has experienced an increase of private land use investments in the past years. Rural householdshave consequently faced crucial changes in their livelihoods. This paper explores the socio-economicimpacts of industrial forest plantations on rural communities in Niassa, Mozambique. According to ourresults private forest plantations have the potential to positively impact local people’s wealth and well-being, if enough emphasis is given to minimizing the negative impacts. The household survey data of218 observations from five villages were analyzed using binary and multinomial logistic regression anal-yses. The study shows that forest plantations have threatened the basis of traditional rural livelihoodsby reducing the availabi...




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Legal and Political (Laws, Regulations, Action Plans, Strategies, etc.)


Niassa National Reserve

Socio-economic impacts of private land use investment on ruralcommunities: Industrial forest plantations in Niassa, Mozambique
Biodiversity Express Survey, The Njesi Plateau expedition, Niassa, MozambiqueJustin Clause, Lore Geeraert, Gabriel Jamie, Emidio Sunbane, Tim van Berkel2017


Niassa








The mountains of northern Mozambique - archipelagos of scattered inselbergs topped with evergreen forests - remain poorly known biologically. Their long geological isolation from the east African rift combined with the conflict-fractured history of Mozambique meant that while they represent an area of clear biological interest they have been subject to very little biological research until recent years. Most recent efforts have focused on the mountains in north-central Mozambique such as Mts Mabu and Namuli, highlighting their unique biological value through landmark discoveries of previously undocumented montane forests and multiple new species to science. Results from this work indicate that Mozambique’s mountains may be distinct bioge...


2016


English


No Restrictions


General


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Niassa National Reserve

Biodiversity Express Survey, The Njesi Plateau expedition, Niassa, Mozambique
ESTIMATING AMOUNT OF BIOMASS LOSS AND CARBON RELEASED TO THE ATMOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF HABITAT CONVERSION OF EASTERN SELOUS – NIASSA TFCAAdili Y. Zella, Josephat Saria and Yohana Lawi.2017


Niassa






Int. J. Adv. Res


Countries’ authorities that managing unfenced protected areas (PAs) as an effort to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem services, airs challenges of climate change and variability which disturb habitat and force wildlife to move to other unprotected areas for adaptation purposes. This scenario necessited the inclusion of those adapted areas into PAs network and recategorise the abandoned areas in the PAs. The unprotected areas include wildlife corridors which connects two or more PAs within the country or transboundary areas famously known as transfrontier conservation areas (TFCAs). However, corridor dwellers especially in developing countries unsustainably utilizing corridor fauna and flora for their livelihoods. This paper explain...




English


No Restrictions


General


Peer-reviewed article


Climate Change and Biodiversity


Niassa National Reserve

ESTIMATING AMOUNT OF BIOMASS LOSS AND CARBON RELEASED TO THE ATMOSPHERE AS A RESULT OF HABITAT CONVERSION OF EASTERN SELOUS – NIASSA TFCA
ASSESSMENT OF DEGRADED FOREST LAND AND DEVELOPMENT OF A RESTORATION PROGRAM FOR DJABULA AND DERRE FORESTSNatasha Ribeiro, Aniceto Chaúque and Ivan Remane2011


Zambézia








IUCN is implementing since end 2007 the Livelihood and Landscape Strategies Program (LLS) in Djabula, Maputo Province and Derre Forets Reserve, Zambézia Province. The goal of the LLS Program is twofold: i) to improve landscape sustainable management; and ii) to improve income generation for local communities through forest-based activities. Specific goals for each project site are: 1) to support discussions and review policies governing the land and resources tenure and, land use rights of communities living in and around the Derre Forest Reserve; and 2) to establish a community wood bank for artisans in Djabula Forest.


2003-2009


English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Ecosystem Restoration;
Impact Assessment


Forest Reserves

ASSESSMENT OF DEGRADED FOREST LAND AND DEVELOPMENT OF A RESTORATION PROGRAM FOR DJABULA AND DERRE FORESTS
RELATÓRIO ANUAL SOBRE GOVERNAÇÃO AMBIENTAL 2020Centro Terra Viva2020


Cabo Delgado;
Gaza;
Tete






Centro Terra Viva


O Centro Terra Viva (CTV) deu início à produção do Relatório Anual sobre Governação Ambiental (RAGA) em 2010, com o objectivo de contribuir para a boa governação na gestão do ambiente e dos recursos naturais em Moçambique, promovendo maior justiça social, equidade e sustentabilidade no acesso e uso dos recursos naturais. Anualmente, é selecionado um tema que constitui objecto de estudo, de modo a analisar com detalhe um determinado assunto sobre governação ambiental. Assim, para o ano 2019, foi escolhido o tema “Medidas de adaptação e resiliência às mudanças climáticas nos processos de reassentamento”. Como estudos de caso foram identificados três processos de reassentamento localizados nas zonas sul, centro e norte do país, nomeadamente: i) Reassentamento no Parque Nacional do Limpopo, na Província de Gaza; ii) Reassentamento nas comunidades 25 de Setembro e Cateme na Província de Tete e, iii) Reassentamento em Namanhumbir, na Província de Cabo Delgado. Para esta pesquisa foram estabelecidos quatro objectivos principais: i) Análise das medidas de adaptação e resiliência às mudanças climáticas estabelecidas no quadro legal vigente sobre reassentamentos; ii) Análise das características dos locais selecionados para a construção da aldeia de reassentamento e do tipo de infraestruturas construídas; iii) Análise do processo de restauração de meios de vida das famílias afectadas (reassentadas e hospedeiras) e medidas de resiliência adoptadas face às mudanças climáticas; e iv) Produção de recomendações que visam a melhoria dos processos em curso e futuros. Para a realização da pesquisa foi usada uma combinação de métodos quantitativos e qualitativos. Para o efeito, foi feita uma revisão bibliográfica e recolhidos dados no terreno através dos diferentes serviços especializados, de medições e entrevistas. As entrevistas foram ministradas aos membros das comunidades e a técnicos do Estado, das empresas envolvidas nos projectos seleccionados, bem como das organizações da sociedade civil que trabalham em áreas relevantes para a presente pesquisa.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


General


General Information


Community Use of Biodiversity


Limpopo National Park

RELATÓRIO ANUAL SOBRE GOVERNAÇÃO AMBIENTAL 2020
Estudo de Lições Aprendidas e Boas Práticas de Reabilitação do Mangal: Avaliação do programa de restauração de mangal no Estuário do Limpopo (Gaza), Tsolombane em Matutuine (Maputo), Nhangau (Sofala), Inhassunge e Macuze (Zambézia) e Mecúfi e Metuge (Cabo Delgado)Salomão Bandeira, Célia Macamo, Rosalina Mahazule e Hugo Mabilana2016


Cabo Delgado;
Gaza;
Maputo;
Sofala;
Zambézia








Moçambique está entre os cinco Países com a maior área de mangal em Africa, sendo o primeiro na África Oriental. Estas florestas cobrem mais de 305.400 hectares ao longo das costas sul, centro e norte, e desempenham um papel muito importante na vida das comunidades locais. Formas de uso intensivas e não sustentáveis concorrem para a degradação do mangal no país, e entre as principais ameaças se destaca a exploração de recursos madeireiros, a expansão urbana e causas naturais. No país, estão em curso várias iniciativas de restauração de florestas de mangal, com o objectivo principal de restaurar as suas funções ecológicas e socioeconómicas, cujas comunidades locais são os primeiros beneficiários. Este estudo tem por objectivo documentar várias experiências de restauração de mangal no país, analisando de forma crítica todo o processo de restauração, e permitindo um aprendizado de lições positivas, assim como identificação de aspectos por melhorar. Também visa estabelecer as bases para o desenho de uma Estratégia e Plano de Acção Nacional para a restauração de mangal no país. Foram visitados 6 locais abrangidos pelo PASA, com o programa de restauração de mangal, a saber: no sul (na Província de Maputo, no Distrito de Matutuine, em Tsolombane; na Província de Gaza, no Distrito de Xai-Xai, Posto Administrativo de Zongoene, na Foz do rio Limpopo Povoado de Mahielane). No centro (na Província de Sofala, Distrito da Beira, em Nhangau; Província da Zambézia, Distrito de Inhassunge em Mussama e Distrito de Namacurra em Macuze). Norte (na Província de Cabo Delgado, Distrito de Mecúfi e Distrito de Metuge). No geral pode se concluir que o programa de reabilitação de mangais deixou como principal legado o aprendizado, que vai permitir que no futuro as falhas sejam corrigidas e melhores programas sejam implementados. Contudo, vale salientar que o processo de restauração do mangal deve ser contínuo, sendo que a capacidade técnica, o monitoramento/acompanhamento a sensibilização e envolvimento da comunidade, a parceria com outras entidades não-governamentais ao lado de uma planificação adequada são factores importantes para o sucesso do programa.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Environmental Impact Assessment, Environmental Management Plans, Biodiversity Counterbalance Plans, and the like


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments;
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


Quirimbas National Park;
Limpopo National Park;
Forest Reserves

Estudo de Lições Aprendidas e Boas Práticas de Reabilitação do Mangal: Avaliação do programa de restauração de mangal no Estuário do Limpopo (Gaza), Tsolombane em Matutuine (Maputo), Nhangau (Sofala), Inhassunge e Macuze (Zambézia) e Mecúfi e Metuge (Cabo Delgado)
Estratégia de Gestão do Mangal 2020-2024Governo de Moçambique2020


Todas as Províncias








A Estratégia Gestão do Mangal, também é um documento que se constitue num instrumento de política concebida para combater e reverter a situação de degradação e destruição do ecossistema de mangal no País. Pretende-se, também, que este instrumento acrescente valor aos esforços que vêm sendo desenvolvidos para impulsionar e orientar a regulação dos direitos, deveres e obrigações quanto ao uso sustentável do ecossistema de mangal em Moçambique. O objectivo desta Estratégia é de manter ou aumentar a biodiversidade, os valores e a função do ecossistema do mangal, de modo a responder às necessidades de protecção ambiental em estuários e zonas costeiras. Pretende-se também que esta estratégia contribua para minimizar os efeitos do aquecimento global através do processo de sequestro e armazenamento de carbono, absorvendo dióxido de carbono da atmosfera e contribuir de forma significativa para o alcance do ODS 14. A implementação da estratégia pode também abrir novos caminhos para o auto-emprego, como o ecoturismo, restauração e replantio, a aquacultura e a apicultura, ajudando a melhorar as condições socio-económicas das comunidades costeiras.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Official Government Document


Legal and Political (Laws, Regulations, Action Plans, Strategies, etc.)


Quirimbas National Park;
Bazaruto Archipelago National Park;
Marromeu Special Reserve;
Primeiras e Segundas Islands Environmental Protection Area;
Forest Reserves

Estratégia de Gestão do Mangal 2020-2024
A DOG WITH TWO MASTERS: FRAGMENTED AND INEFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MANGROVES IN MOZAMBIQUEManuel Castiano2020


Todas as Províncias






IUCN, International Union for Conservation of Nature and WWF Moçambique


Mangroves in Mozambique are mostly located in coastal areas, deltas, and estuaries of main rivers, and are widespread all over the country. Due to mangroves’ recognized ecological function in protecting shorelines from floods and cyclones, concerns regarding the increase in mangrove degradradation are now high on the agenda of the government of Mozambique. It has expressed and built a constitutional, political, strategic, and legal foundation which impact on mangrove conservation, management, and restoration. Political will and joint engagement of multiple governmental agencies with a role in mangroves, as well as Civil Society Organizations, local communities, and the private sector are required to promote mangrove conservation. It has been reported that there is already ongoing joint engagement in some areas. Despite national and international commitments, Mozambique still faces key challenges to domesticate international legally binding instruments and to secure the effective implementation of fragmented and diverse legal provisions, causing difficulties in understanding and enforcing the legal framework governing mangroves in a holistic, consistent and comprehensive way. Another challenge is connected to the effectiveness of protected areas, which is linked to coastal development, the discovery of mining resources on the coast, and wetland and aquaculture development. Draft




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


Forest Reserves

A DOG WITH TWO MASTERS: FRAGMENTED AND INEFFECTIVE MANAGEMENT OF MANGROVES IN MOZAMBIQUE
Mozambique Mangrove Mapping via Satellite from 1994 – 2016Aurelie Shapiro2018


Todas as Províncias






WWF Moçambique


Mozambique has over 300,000 hectares of mangroves along its coast, which is the larg-est tract of mangrove forest in Africa, and ranks the country 13th in the word in terms of mangrove extent. WWF-Germany and WWF-Mozambique have partnered to map Mozambique’s mangroves in efforts to conserve, manage and restore them. This analysis estimates mangrove extent in Mozambique over nearly three decades using consistent methods and the newest satellite technologies available. This report presents the map-ping results by province and is the first extensive national level assessment of mangroves at the national scale using highest resolution available. This assessment uses several satellite technologies: the Landsat Thematic Mapper, En-hanced Thematic mapper and Optical Land Imager provide the long term time series for change mapping at 30m resolution. Additionally, data from the new Sentinel-2 were used. This sensor launched in 2015 by the European Space Agency, and provides data similar to Landsat 8, but with 3times higher resolution and additional spectral bands. This dataset was used to map Mozambique’s mangroves at 10m resolution for the year 2016.




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Maps and non-georeferenced data (as jpg, pdf, .zip, data etc.)


Protected Areas


Quirimbas National Park;
Bazaruto Archipelago National Park;
Maputo Special Reserve;
Marromeu Special Reserve;
Niassa National Reserve;
Primeiras e Segundas Islands Environmental Protection Area;
Others National Conservation Areas

Mozambique Mangrove Mapping via Satellite from 1994 – 2016
Mapping Africa’s Biodiversity: More of the Same Is Just Not Good EnoughHARITH FAROOQ, JOSUÉ A.R. AZEVEDO, AMADEU SOARES, ALEXANDRE ANTONELLI1, and SOREN FAURBY2020


N/A








Species distribution data are fundamental to the understanding of biodiversity patterns and processes. Yet, such data are strongly affected by sampling biases, mostly related to site accessibility. The understanding of these biases is therefore crucial in systematics, biogeography, and conservation. Herewe present a novel approach for quantifying sampling effort and its impact on biodiversity knowledge, focusing on Africa. In contrast to previous studies assessing sampling completeness (percentage of species recorded in relation to predicted), we investigate whether the lack of knowledge of a site attracts scientists to visit these areas and collect samples of species...




English


No Restrictions


General


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


None

Mapping Africa’s Biodiversity: More of the Same Is Just Not Good Enough
Effective implementation of age restrictions increases selectivity of sport hunting of the African lionColleen M. Begg, Jennifer R. B. Miller, Keith S. Begg12017


Niassa


DOI: 10.1111/1365-2664.12951




Journal of Applied Ecology


1. Sport hunting of wildlife can play a role in conservation but can also drive population declines if not managed sustainably. Previous simulation modelling found that large felid species could theoretically be hunted sustainably by restricting harvests to older individuals that have likely reproduced. Several African countries currently use age-based hunting for lions although the outcomes have yet to be evaluated in a wild population. 2. Here we provide the first empirical evidence that a system of incentives sufficiently encouraged age-based hunting and reduced offtake of a wild felid, thereby reducing the potential risk of unsustainable hunting on a threatened species. We examined long-term hunting data and the lion population trend..




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Niassa National Reserve

Effective implementation of age restrictions increases selectivity of sport hunting of the African lion
Characterization of the Primary Metabolome of Brachystegia boehmii and Colophospermum mopane under Different Fire Regimes in Miombo and Mopane African WoodlandsJossias A. Duvane, Tiago F. Jorge, Ivete Maquia, Natasha Ribeiro4, Ana I. F. Ribeiro-Barros and Carla António2017


Gaza;
Niassa


doi: 10.3389/fpls.2017.02130




Frontiers in Plant Science


Miombo and Mopane are ecological and economic important woodlands from Africa, highly affected by a combination of climate change factors, and anthropogenic fires. Although most species of these ecosystems are fire tolerant, the mechanisms that lead to adaptive responses (metabolic reconfiguration) are unknown. In this context, the aim of this study was to characterize the primary metabolite composition of typical legume trees from these ecosystems, namely, Brachystegia boehmii (Miombo) and Colophospermum mopane (Mopane) subjected to different fire regimes. Fresh leaves from each species were collected in management units and landscapes across varied fire frequencies in the Niassa National Reserve (NNR) and Limpopo National Park (LNP) in...




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Limpopo National Park;
Niassa National Reserve

Characterization of the Primary Metabolome of Brachystegia boehmii and Colophospermum mopane under Different Fire Regimes in Miombo and Mopane African Woodlands
Patterns of for est loss in one of Africa’s last remaining wilderness areas: Niassa national reserve (northern Mozambique)James R. Allan, Falk Grossmann, Rob Craig, Alastair Nelson, Joseph Maina, Kathleen Flower, James Bampton, Jean-Bap􀆟ste Deffontaines, Cornelio Miguel, Baldeu Araquechande and James E.M. Watson2017


Niassa


DOI: 10.2305/IUCN.CH.2017.PARKS-23-2JRA.en




PARKS


Niassa National Reserve (NNR) supports Mozambique’s largest populations of endangered fauna and sustains the livelihoods of > 40,000 people who utilise its natural resources. Accurately monitoring finescale spatial and temporal trends in land-use and tree-cover is increasingly used for monitoring the ecological state of conservation areas. Here we provide essential information on land-use changes in NNR to support ongoing conservation efforts in the region. We examined patterns of forest and woodland loss in NNR between 2001 and 2014 using high resolution maps of global tree-cover change, and compared this with changes in the wider region. We found that NNR lost 108 km2 of forest (0.9 per cent of its 11,970 km2 aggregated forest extent)...




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Niassa National Reserve

Patterns of for est loss in one of Africa’s last remaining wilderness areas: Niassa national reserve (northern Mozambique)
Soil Analysis for FERTILITY DECLINE ASSESSMENT AND ITS RECOVERING FOR SUSTAINABLE & PERMANENT FOOD CROPS PRODUCTION IN MBAMBAJacinto M. Mafalacusser2017


N/A






Niassa CARNIVORE Project






English


No Restrictions


General


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Niassa National Reserve

Soil Analysis for FERTILITY DECLINE ASSESSMENT AND ITS RECOVERING FOR SUSTAINABLE & PERMANENT FOOD CROPS PRODUCTION IN MBAMBA
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