Virtual Library

The BIOFUND Virtual Library is an online archive of information on Mozambique’s biodiversity, organized along the lines suggested by the Convention on Biodiversity’s Clearing House Mechanism. The Virtual Library will strive to make available all the documents, studies, reports, articles, educational and communications materials, maps and digital files that have been produced, to serve as a repository of our collective institutional memory as a conservation community. The usefulness of the Virtual Library will improve the more we share amongst ourselves. If you have any materials that are not currently part of the Virtual Library, please click on "Add Document" and become a contributor.

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Title Author Year of Publication
Relatório Temático da Demarcação de Terras à Favor de Associações de Produtores nas Comunidades RuraisCavane, E. Et al.2014


Gaza;
Manica;
Nampula






CEAGRE UEM-FAEF & iTC


O presente relatório apresenta a síntese dos resultados da sistematização das experiências de demarcação de terras comunitárias a favor de associações de produtores nas províncias de Gaza, Manica e Nampula.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Community Use of Biodiversity


None

Relatório Temático da Demarcação de Terras à Favor de Associações de Produtores nas Comunidades Rurais
Actividades recreativas na Reserva Marinha Parcial da Ponta do Ouro (2010-2014). Volume 1: Informação geralFernandes, R. & Pereira, M.2015


Maputo






CTV


A Reserva Marinha Parcial da Ponta do Ouro (RMPPO) foi criada em 2009 pelo decreto 43/2009 de 21 de Agosto com o objetivo de preservar e proteger espécies marinhas, costeiras e seus habitats. A RMPPO apresenta um elevado potencial natural para o turismo. Assim, no presente volume é feita uma análise das actividades turísticas e recreativas de base marinha, em curso na RMPPO, tais como o mergulho SCUBA (que representa 43% do total de lançamentos de embarcações), pesca desportiva e recreativa (39%), mergulhos com golfinhos (9%) e excursões marinhas (7%). Entre 2010 e 2014, um total de 30 329 lançamentos de embarcações (skiboats, jetskis e canoas) foram registados.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


Marine Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Economics, Trade and Incentive Measures;
Protected Areas;
Tourism and Biodiversity


Ponta do Ouro Partial Marine Reserve

Actividades recreativas na Reserva Marinha Parcial da Ponta do Ouro (2010-2014). Volume 1: Informação geral
Gamba spirits, gender relations, and healing in post-civil war Gorongosa, MozambiqueIgreja, V.; Dias-Lambranca, B. & Richters, A.2008


Todas as Províncias






Royal Anthropological Institute


This article describes the ways in which in post-civil war Gorongosa (central Mozambique), women (and occasionally men) with personal and/or family experiences of extreme suffering are the focal point of possession by male, war-related spirits named gamba. However, gamba spirits also create post-war healing in which memory work and gender politics play an essential role. This type of post-war healing is demonstrated through a secret, contractual ceremony in which a male living suitor demands permission from a gamba spirit, lodged in the body of a young woman (his deemed wife), to marry that woman.




English


No Restrictions


General


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Gender and Biodiversity


None

Gamba spirits, gender relations, and healing in post-civil war Gorongosa, Mozambique
Capacity Development Training Workshop on Water and Sustainable – Volume II – Case studiesWWAP (United Nations World Water Assessment Programme)2016


N/A


http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/igo




UNESCO


Sustainable development is a ‘development that meets the needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to meet their own needs’ (UN, 1987). Embedded in this definition are two key concepts: a) the concept of needs, in particular essential needs of the world’s poor, to which overriding priority should be given; and b) the idea of limitations imposed by the state of technology and social organization on the environment’s ability to meet the present and future needs’ (UN, 1987). The link between water and sustainable development was stressed by the UN Secretary General, Ban Ki-Moon: ‘Water is at the core of sustainable development as it is closely linked to a number of key global challenges.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


None

Capacity Development Training Workshop on Water and Sustainable – Volume II – Case studies
UNESCO Mozambique: Annual Report 2015UNESCO2016


N/A








This report summarizes the work and achievements accomplished by UNESCO in Mozambique in 2015, in response to the main development issues and challenges of the country. UNESCO supports the implementation of national priorities and strategies, as spelled out in the Government of Mozambique five-year plan (2015-2019) and in the United Nations Development Assistance Framework for Mozambique (UNDAF) for 2012-2016.




English


No Restrictions


General


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

UNESCO Mozambique: Annual Report 2015
Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: A Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, MozambiqueMercader, J. Et al.2009


Niassa






Journal of Human Evolution


Direct evidence for a systematic occupation of the African tropics during the early late Pleistocene is lacking. Here, we report a record of human occupation between 105–42 ka, based on results from a radiometrically-dated cave section from the Mozambican segment of the Niassa (Malawi/Nyasa) Rift called Ngalue. The sedimentary sequence from bottom to top has five units. We concentrate on the socalled ‘‘Middle Beds,’’ which contain a Middle Stone Age industry characterized by the use of the discoidal reduction technique. A significant typological feature is the presence of formal types such as points, scrapers, awls, and microliths. Special objects consist of grinders/core-axes covered by ochre.




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity;
Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


None

Initial excavation and dating of Ngalue Cave: A Middle Stone Age site along the Niassa Rift, Mozambique
Relearning traditional knowledge to achieve sustainability: honey gathering in the miombo woodlands of northern MozambiqueSnook, L. Et al.2015


Niassa






XIV WORLD FORESTRY CONGRESS


Mozambique’s Niassa Reserve contains Africa’s best preserved miombo woodlands. Half of the households there gather wild honey from natural hives for consumption and income. However, most collectors used destructive techniques: setting fire to the grasses under the hive tree to create smoke and then felling the tree. Cutting trees to obtain honey was the principal source of tree mortality. Trees grow very slowly, about 0.25 cm diameter [dbh]/yr, meaning an average hive tree was nearly 200 years old. Furthermore, of the trees > 20 cm dbh of species important for nectar and hives, only about 15% had cavities.




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Traditional Knowledge, Innovations and Practices;
Community Use of Biodiversity


Niassa National Reserve

Relearning traditional knowledge to achieve sustainability: honey gathering in the miombo woodlands of northern Mozambique
A clash of values and approaches: A case study of marine protected area planning in MozambiqueRosendo, S. Et al.2011


Todas as Províncias






Ocean & Coastal Management


Many developing countries are expanding their network of Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) to meet ambitious marine conservation targets set globally and to develop tourism nationally. This study explores the human dimensions of MPA planning in Mozambique by engaging local resource users in a series of structured discussions about marine resource use, pressures on marine resources, ways to address such pressures, and the potential positive and negative impacts of MPAs on the management of marine resources and livelihoods, from a community perspective.




English


No Restrictions


Marine Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Protected Areas


Quirimbas National Park;
Bazaruto Archipelago National Park;
Pomene National Reserve;
Lake Niassa Partial Marine Reserve;
Ponta do Ouro Partial Marine Reserve;
Cabo de São Sebastião Total Protection Zone;
Inhaca Biological Reserve;
Primeiras e Segundas Islands Environmental Protection Area

A clash of values and approaches: A case study of marine protected area planning in Mozambique
Garimpo no distrito de Gorongosa implicações para o Parque Nacional da GorongosaDondeyne, S.; Nhaca, F. & Jantar, P.2007


Sofala






MICOA/CDS-RN


No distrito de Gorongosa, estudamos a situação actual em relação à exploração artesanal, com particular atenção ao Parque Nacional da Gorongosa. Em 2003 camponeses de Tsiquiri, à cerca de 7 quilómetros do Parque, descobriram ouro, o que atraiu até 3000 garimpeiros na zona. Porque o governo estava preocupado com as repercussões negativas ao Parque, esta actividade foi proibida. Constatamos que os esforços de fiscalização são efectivos, e que praticamente não há nenhuma actividade de garimpo nas zonas em redor do Parque. As águas de quase todos os rios que escorrem ao Parque eram muito claras, indicando que os mesmos não são afectados pelo garimpo.




Portuguese


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Impact Assessment;
Threats to Biodiversity


Gorongosa National Park

Garimpo no distrito de Gorongosa implicações para o Parque Nacional da Gorongosa
Human–wildlife conflict in Mozambique: a national perspective, with emphasis on wildlife attacks on humansDunham, K. Et al.2010


Todas as Províncias






Fauna & Flora International


Human–wildlife conflicts are common across Africa. In Mozambique, official records show that wildlife killed 265 people during 27 months (July 2006 to September 2008). Crocodile Crocodylus niloticus, lion Panthera leo, elephant Loxodonta africana and hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius caused most deaths but crocodiles were responsible for 66%. Crocodile attacks occurred across Mozambique but 53% of deaths occurred in districts bordering Lake Cabora Bassa and the Zambezi River. Hippopotamus attacks were also concentrated here.




English


No Restrictions


General


Peer-reviewed article


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity;
Threats to Biodiversity;
Health & Biodiversity


All Protected Areas of Mozambique

Human–wildlife conflict in Mozambique: a national perspective, with emphasis on wildlife attacks on humans
The Problems of Artisanal Gold Mining in Manica ProvinceMachon, A. Et al.2012


Manica






UniZambeze & Mining Development Fund


The artisanal and small scale mining is a generic term that means something different to different people, countries and organizations. In an African perspective, artisanal and small scale mining was defined by Dreschler (2001) as mining operations carried out by individuals organized into groups (four to eight individuals) or cooperatives of ten or more individuals, which are entirely financed by limited resources and undertaken full-time, using simple techniques and traditional instruments with low level of mechanization. The main aim of this booklet is to share with the public the results of a scientific research in the area of artisanal mining carried out in the last 20 years in Manica Province in central Mozambique.




English


No Restrictions


Other Terrestrial Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Community Use of Biodiversity;
Threats to Biodiversity


None

The Problems of Artisanal Gold Mining in Manica Province
Freshwater Ecoregions of the World: A New Map of Biogeographic Units for Freshwater Biodiversity ConservationAbell, R. Et al.2008


N/A






BioScience


We present a new map depicting the first global biogeographic regionalization of Earth’s freshwater systems. This map of freshwater ecoregions is based on the distributions and compositions of freshwater fish species and incorporates major ecological and evolutionary patterns. Covering virtually all freshwater habitats on Earth, this ecoregion map, together with associated species data, is a useful tool for underpinning global and regional conservation planning efforts (particularly to identify outstanding and imperiled freshwater systems); for serving as a logical framework for large-scale conservation strategies; and for providing a global-scale knowledge base for increasing freshwater biogeographic literacy.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Freshwater Ecoregions of the World: A New Map of Biogeographic Units for Freshwater Biodiversity Conservation
Diet-shifts and food-dependent survival in Engraulicypris sardella (Cyprinidae) larvae from Lake Malawi, AfricaThompson, A. & Irvine, K.1997


N/A






Journal of Plankton Research


The diet of Engraulicypris sardella (Cyprinidae) larvae was determined from the open waters of Lake Malawi, Africa. The guts of first-feeding larvae of 2-3 mm total length (TL) usually contained many cells of 5-9 um diameter tentatively identified as a non-colonial green alga (Chlorophyta). The number of these cells in the guts of larvae declined as larvae increased in size, and were not found in larvae greater than 9 mm TL. Other types of phytoplankton were rarely seen in the guts of larvae. Copepod nauplii were eaten by larvae greater than 4 mm TL, and copepodite copepods and cladoceans by larvae greater than 5 mm TL. The biomass of open water crustacean zooplankton and E.sardella larvae were determined over a 2-year sampling programme.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


None

Diet-shifts and food-dependent survival in Engraulicypris sardella (Cyprinidae) larvae from Lake Malawi, Africa
The Vertical Distribution of Runoff and its Suspended Load in Lake MalawiMcCullough, G.; Barber, D. & Cooley, P.2007


N/A






J. Great Lakes Res.


Lake Malawi, in south-eastern Africa, is subject to increasing loading of suspended solids caused by land use pressure in its watershed. Whether this load is transported into the lake as overflow, interflow or deep underflow determines to a large extent its effect on the lake ecosystem. In this paper, vertical distributions of suspended solids in the Linthipe River delta region of the lake are described from multiple surveys during two rainy seasons. These data are supplemented by data from a single survey near four northern rivers also tributary to the lake.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

The Vertical Distribution of Runoff and its Suspended Load in Lake Malawi
The Status and Distribution of Freshwater Biodiversity in Southern AfricaDarwall, W. Et al.2009


N/A






IUCN and Grahamstown


Biodiversity within inland water ecosystems in southern Africa is both highly diverse and of great regional importance to livelihoods and economies. However, development activities are not always compatible with the conservation of this diversity and it is poorly represented within the development planning process. One of the main reasons cited for inadequate representation of biodiversity is a lack of readily available information on the status and distribution of inland water taxa.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


None

The Status and Distribution of Freshwater Biodiversity in Southern Africa
Double exposure in Mozambique’s Limpopo River BasinSilva, J.; Eriksen, S. & Ombe, Z.2010


Gaza






The Geographical Journal


This paper examines how double exposure to economic and environmental stressors – and the interaction between the two – affect smallholder farmers in Mozambique’s Limpopo River Basin. Studying two case study villages we find that people, in general, are resilient to environmental stressors. However, most households show less resilience to the socioeconomic stressors and shocks that have been introduced or intensified by economic globalisation. Our findings indicate that economic change brought about by structural adjustment policies pressures rural people to alter their approach to farming, which makes it more difficult for them to respond to environmental change




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Limpopo National Park

Double exposure in Mozambique’s Limpopo River Basin
A Modelling Approach for Lake Malawi/Nyasa/Niassa: Integrating Hydrological and Limnological DataLam, D. Et al.2004


Niassa






Advances in Global Research Series


This study presents a toolkit approach for linking land- and lake-based data and models to determine the impact of human activities on the water quality of rivers and lakes. The integrated modelling framework was adapted to address specific issues and scenarios. Based on the preliminary results, a hypothetical 50% re-forestation of the Linthipe Watershed in the southern part of Lake Malawi/Nyasa/Niassa may lead to a decrease in the spring peak value of total phosphorus concentration from about 15 mg/L to 10 mg/L in the top layer (0 – 40 m) of the lake’s Outlet Basin. Discussions on improvement to future modelling and monitoring programs are also presented.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Lake Niassa Partial Marine Reserve

A Modelling Approach for Lake Malawi/Nyasa/Niassa: Integrating Hydrological and Limnological Data
Tracing geographical patterns of population differentiation in a widespread mangrove gastropod: genetic and geometric morphometrics surveys along the eastern African coastMadeira, C. Et al.2012


N/A






Biological Journal of the Linnean Society


In the present study, we assessed the inter- and intrapopulation genetic and morphological variation of Cerithidea decollata along the eastern coast of Africa. The population structure of C. decollata along the latitudinal gradient was examined by sequencing 420 bp of the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase I (COI) gene in 172 snails from 29 sites, in a combined analysis with geometric morphometrics in 1799 snails from 32 sites. Analysis of molecular variance and spatial analysis of molecular variance showed a moderate spatial population differentiation from Kenya to the Republic of South Africa, suggesting genetic divergence between the northern, central, and southern regions.




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Tracing geographical patterns of population differentiation in a widespread mangrove gastropod: genetic and geometric morphometrics surveys along the eastern African coast
Technical Consultation Between Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania on the Development and Management of the Fisheries of Lake Malawi/Niassa/NyasaFAO2003


Todas as Províncias








This document is the final report of the Technical Consultation between Malawi. Mozambique and Tanzania on the Development and Management of the Fisheries of Lake Malawi/Niassa/Nyasa. The major topics discussed were: current status of the fisheries in the Lake Malawi/Niassa/Nyasa national sectors; legislations, restrictions, monitoring, control and surveillance; and fisheries management and environmental degradation issues. The summary of the main recommendations and decisions is shown in Appendix D.




English


No Restrictions


Marine Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


None

Technical Consultation Between Malawi, Mozambique and Tanzania on the Development and Management of the Fisheries of Lake Malawi/Niassa/Nyasa
Importance of terrestrial subsidies for estuarine food webs in contrasting East African catchmentsAbrantes, K. Et al.2013


N/A






ECOPHERE


Little is known on the degree to which terrestrial organic matter delivered to tropical estuaries contributes to estuarine consumers. Here, stable isotope analysis is used to constrain this contribution for contrasting east African estuaries whose catchments differ in relative C3/C4 vegetation cover.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Importance of terrestrial subsidies for estuarine food webs in contrasting East African catchments
An Ichthyological and Bio-monitoring Survey of Fish Assemblages in the Vunduzi River from it Source on Gorongosa Mountain to its Lower Reaches in the Gorongosa National Park, MoçambiqueSara, J. Et al.2012


Manica;
Sofala






University of Limpopo


To date no study has been done on the composition of the itchyofauna in the Vunduzi River or other rivers in the Park. Little is known about the fish populations in the upper reaches of the mountain because it is difficult to access. Hence the goal of this study was twofold. The first aim was to establish the fish composition in the Vunduzi River system and to establish what effect biotic vs. abiotic factors have on species assemblages. Since the Vunduzi River is vital and a continual source of water for Lake Urema and the GNP as a whole this investigation serves as a baseline study to assist Park authorities with decision-making when considering the impact anthropogenic activities such as deforestation and increased settlements.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity;
Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Gorongosa National Park

An Ichthyological and Bio-monitoring Survey of Fish Assemblages in the Vunduzi River from it Source on Gorongosa Mountain to its Lower Reaches in the Gorongosa National Park, Moçambique
Geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology of Lake Urema, central Mozambique, with focus on lake extent changesBohme, B. Et al.2006


Sofala






Physics and Chemistry of the Earth


Lake Urema is one of the most important ecological features of Gorongosa National Park, located in central Mozambique, in the East African Rift System. Understanding hydrology and ecology of the lake and its tributaries is particularly important for the conservation of the Park’s floodplain habitats and its biodiversity. There are concerns that hydrological boundary conditions and ecology of Lake Urema have changed in recent years. Possible causes for this change include climatic and land use changes as well as tectonic and geomorphological processes. In this study, a multi-temporal and multi-disciplinary approach was applied to investigate the dynamics and control mechanisms of Lake Urema.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Geomorphology, hydrology, and ecology of Lake Urema, central Mozambique, with focus on lake extent changes
Small mammals of the Zambezi wetlandsCotterill, F.2000


Sofala;
Tete;
Zambézia








Small mammals make up a significant proportion of the mammal fauna of the Zambezi Basin. With the exception of the poorly known otter-shrew, Potamogale velox (known only from Mwinilunga District in NE Zambia), there are no specialized mammals occurring in the basin that are entirely dependent on wetlands. Yet wetlands are important habitats for small mammals; floodplains support fluctuating populations of rats and mice, as do riparian forests and woodlands, and shrews exploit the abundance of invertebrates found there. Bats are particularly well-adapted to exploit insect prey foraging over floodplains and open water, provided roosts are available on wetland margins.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Small mammals of the Zambezi wetlands
Mangrove kingfishers (Halcyon senegaloides; Aves: Alcedinidae) nesting in arboreal Nasutitermes (Isoptera: Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae) termitaria in central MozambiqueDavies, G. Et al.2012


Sofala;
Zambézia






Annals of the Ditsong National Museum of Natural History


Across the world’s tropics at least six genera and more than 40 species of kingfisher (Alcedinidae) are known to nest in arboreal termite nests or termitaria (Fry et al., 1992). They form part of a tropicopolitan guild of arboreal termitaria nesters that includes trogons, parrots, barbets, woodpeckers, jacamars, and puffbirds (Hindwood, 1959; Brightsmith, 2000, 2004). Amongst the Afrotropical Halcyon kingfishers, the behaviour is best known from Central and West Africa where it is documented in three species: chocolate-backed (Halcyon badia), blue-breasted (H. maxima) and woodland (H. senegalensis subspecies fuscopilea) kingfishers (Chapin, 1939; Brosset and Erard, 1986; Fry et al., 1988, 1992; Clancey, 1992).




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Mangrove kingfishers (Halcyon senegaloides; Aves: Alcedinidae) nesting in arboreal Nasutitermes (Isoptera: Termitidae: Nasutitermitinae) termitaria in central Mozambique
Stratified settlement and moulting competency of brachyuran megalopae in Ponta Rasa mangrove swamp, Inhaca Island (Mozambique)Paula, J.; Dornelas, M. & Flores, A.2003


Maputo






Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science


Information on recruitment processes of mangrove crustaceans is very limited, in spite of the great importance of these environments for the coastal zone. This study describes the settlement patterns of brachyuran crabs at Ponta Rasa mangrove swamp, Inhaca Island, in order to assess if settlement patterns reflect adult distribution. Hoghair filter collectors were deployed at different strata within the mangrove, and at the adjacent intertidal flat as control. Sampling was conducted daily for a period of 82 days. The collected megalopae were reared in the laboratory to assess their moulting competency and to enable identification.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Ecosystem Restoration


Inhaca Biological Reserve

Stratified settlement and moulting competency of brachyuran megalopae in Ponta Rasa mangrove swamp, Inhaca Island (Mozambique)
Analysis of water stable isotopes fingerprinting to inform conservation management: Lake Urema Wetland System, MozambiqueSteinbruch, F. & Weise, S.2014


Sofala






Physics and Chemistry of the Earth


The present study focusses on the analysis of water stable isotopes to contribute to understanding the hydrology of the Lake Urema wetland system in central Mozambique towards conservation management. Lake Urema Wetland is located in the Gorongosa National Park at the southernmost extent of the East African Rift System and is situated entirely within the Urema catchment. Of particular concern to the park’s management is the understanding of hydrological processes as these may trigger transformations of ecosystems, habitat losses and wildlife migrations. Concerns over the Lake Urema wetland’s drying up and the trapping of sediments in the floodplain have been raised for some time by conservationists.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Gorongosa National Park

Analysis of water stable isotopes fingerprinting to inform conservation management: Lake Urema Wetland System, Mozambique
Zambezi Basin Wetlands Conservation and Resource Utilisation Project: Inception Mission ReportHiscock, E.; Matiza-Chiuta, T. & Lash, T.1996


Sofala;
Tete;
Zambézia






IUCN


The Inception Mission for the Zambezi Basin Wetlands Conservation and Resource Utilization Project consisted of three major phases: • consultation with stakeholders in a variety of locations • a regional workshop involving selected experts • report production. The first two phases were entirely successful in that excellent cooperation from stakeholders, potential partners and other cooperants was experienced throughout the mission.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Project Document, Project Reports and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity;
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


None

Zambezi Basin Wetlands Conservation and Resource Utilisation Project: Inception Mission Report
Current status and distribution of the Vulnerable common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius in MozambiqueMackie, C; Dunham, K. & Ghiurghi, A.2012


Todas as Províncias






Fauna & Flora International


Populations of the common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius in Mozambique were surveyed in 2010 during a national survey of the crocodile Crocodylus niloticus. Numbers of hippos seen during aerial counts along major rivers and lake shores were corrected to allow for undercounting of groups and these data were supplemented with the results of other recent surveys. There are now estimated to be c. 3,000 hippos in Mozambique and c. 50%of these live in Lake Cabora Bassa or the Zambezi Rive




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Current status and distribution of the Vulnerable common hippopotamus Hippopotamus amphibius in Mozambique
Descriptions of Ten Xanthoidean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) First Stage Zoeas from Inhaca Island, MozambiqueClark, P. & Paula, J.2003


Maputo






THE RAFFLES BULLETIN OF ZOOLOGY


The zoea stage I of seven xanthoidean (sensu Serène, 1984) crab species, collected from Inhaca Island, Mozambique, and hatched in the laboratory are described for the first time, Epixanthus frontalis (H. Milne Edwards, 1834), Lydia annulipes (H. Milne Edwards, 1834), Eriphia scabricula Dana, 1852, Lybia plumosa Barnard, 1947, Pilodius paumotensis Rathbun, 1907, Zozymodes xanthoides (Krauss, 1843) and Eurycarcinus natalensis (Krauss, 1843). Leptodius exaratus (H. Milne Edwards, 1834), Pilumnus longicornis Hilgendorf, 1879 and Pilumnus vespertilio (Fabricius, 1793) first stage zoeas are redescribed. A comparative study of all these larvae, especially anntenal morphology, is presented.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity;
Coastal Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Inhaca Biological Reserve

Descriptions of Ten Xanthoidean (Crustacea: Decapoda: Brachyura) First Stage Zoeas from Inhaca Island, Mozambique
Wattled Cranes, waterbirds, and wetland conservation in the Zambezi Delta, MozambiqueBento, C. & Beilfuss, R.2000


Zambézia




WORKING PAPERS OF THE PROGRAM FOR THE SUSTAINABLE MANAGEMENT OF CAHORA BASSA DAM AND THE LOWER ZAMBEZI VALLEY




The principal objectives of the study were to: (a) compile annotated checklists of waterbirds from various representative sites in the Zambezi Delta; (b) present a report giving techniques used and evaluating the findings; and (c) indicating particular species or sites of interest. As we were involved in a similar study looking at potential impacts of dam construction (described in Bento & Beilfuss 1999), many of the findings and sections are common to both reports.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Wattled Cranes, waterbirds, and wetland conservation in the Zambezi Delta, Mozambique
The Fishing Centres of Lake Niassa (Mozambique)Massinga, A. & Contreras, P.1988


Niassa






Revista de Investigação Pesqueira


This report presents the results of the first frame survey of the fishing centres on the Mozambican coast of Lake Niassa, held in June 1983. A total of 41 fishing centres were detected in the area and visited. Through direct enquiries in each centre an estimated number of 3 380 fishermen and 1 230 fishing boats (of which 25 motorized) were established. The enquires gave also information on the type~ and quantities of fishing gear used.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Lake Niassa Partial Marine Reserve

The Fishing Centres of Lake Niassa (Mozambique)
The Rovuma Delta deep-water fold-and-thrust belt, offshore MozambiqueMahanjane, E. & Franke, D.2014


Cabo Delgado






Tectonophysics


We interpret two-dimensional seismic reflection data from the Rovuma Delta basin deep-water fold-and-thrust belts. Two major arcuate complexes with different architecture and extent are identified.While in the northern Palma arcuate complex a multitude of steep, east-dipping thrust-related fold anticlines formed above a single main detachment, in the southern Mocimboa arcuate complex multiple detachments resulted in the formation of thrust duplexes. In between the two arcuate domains, only few thrust-related fold anticlines developed.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity;
Marine Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

The Rovuma Delta deep-water fold-and-thrust belt, offshore Mozambique
Proceedings of the Lake Malawi Fisheries Management SymposiumWeyl, O. & Weyl, M.2001


N/A












English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Reports, Studies, Biodiversity Baselines and Evaluations


Biological and Cultural Diversity;
Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments;
Protected Areas;
Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


None

Proceedings of the Lake Malawi Fisheries Management Symposium
Carbon stocks of mangroves within the Zambezi River Delta, MozambiqueStringer, C. Et al.2015


Sofala;
Tete;
Zambézia






Forest Ecology and Management


Mangroves are well-known for their numerous ecosystem services, including storing a globally significant C pool. There is increasing interest in the inclusion of mangroves in national climate change mitigation and adaptation plans in developing nations as they become involved with incentive programs for climate change mitigation. The quality and precision of data required by these programs necessitates the use of an inventory approach that allows for quantification, rather than general characterization, of C stocks. In this study, we quantified the ecosystem C stock of the Zambezi River Delta mangroves utilizing a rigorous, yet operationally feasible approach.




English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Carbon stocks of mangroves within the Zambezi River Delta, Mozambique
Biomass and Carbon Stocks of Sofala Bay Mangrove ForestsSitoe, A; Mandlate, J. & Guesdes, B.2014


Sofala






forests






English


No Restrictions


Forest Biodiversity;
Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Biological and Cultural Diversity


None

Biomass and Carbon Stocks of Sofala Bay Mangrove Forests
An Overview of the Impact of Mining and Mineral Processing Operations on Water Resources and Water Quality in the Zambezi, Limpopo and Olifants Catchments in Southern AfricaAshton, P. Et al.2001


Gaza;
Sofala;
Tete;
Zambézia






CSIR-Environmentek, South Africa and Geology Department, University of Zimbabwe


The original Terms of Reference for this study (Research Topic 4) were extremely broad and required an overview of all mining impacts on the biophysical environment throughout southern Africa. Though this objective was desirable, and would provide an excellent background for management strategies in each of the SADC countries, it was unrealistic in view of the time and budget constraints. Therefore, the main focus of this research topic was restricted to water resources, in particular water quality, and attention confined to three key river basins, namely the Zambezi, Limpopo and Olifants basins. Whilst the revised Terms of Reference remain challenging, they represent a compromise that enabled a useful body of work to be produced.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Impact Assessment


Limpopo National Park

An Overview of the Impact of Mining and Mineral Processing Operations on Water Resources and Water Quality in the Zambezi, Limpopo and Olifants Catchments in Southern Africa
Herpetological survey of the Niassa Game Reserve, northern Mozambique – Part I: ReptilesBranch, W.; Rodel, M-O. & Marais, J.2005


Niassa






SALAMANDRA


Significant contributions to the poorly known reptile fauna of northern Mozambique were made during a biodiversity survey of the Niassa Game Reserve (NGR), situated in northern Mozambique, bordering Tanzania. Of approximately 100 reptile species currently known from northern Mozambique, 57 species were recorded from the NGR. Important discoveries included: a new species of girdled lizard (Cordylus sp.) in rock cracks on the summit outcrops of Serra Mecula; the first national records of Melanoseps sp. and Lygodactylus angularis (both isolated populations are atypical and further studies are required to assess their taxonomic status).




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Niassa National Reserve

Herpetological survey of the Niassa Game Reserve, northern Mozambique – Part I: Reptiles
New Metacestodes of Gryporhynchid Tapeworms (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from Carp (Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758) from Mozambique, AfricaScholz, T.; Boane, C. & Saraiva, A.2008


N/A






Comp. Parasitol.


Larvae of 2 species of gryporhynchid tapeworms (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) were found in common carp (Cyprinus carpio L.) from Mozambique, Africa. Metacestodes of Parvitaenia samfyia Mettrick, 1967, a species never reported since the original description of its adults from herons (Ardeidae) in Zambia were found in the intestinal wall, whereas larvae of an unidentified species of Cyclustera Fuhrmann, 1901, closely resembling Cyclustera magna (Baer, 1959), a species with larvae previously reported from Tillapia zillii (Gervais) in Africa, were encapsulated in the liver of carp. Larval stages of both gryporhynchids are reported from fish for the first time.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


None

New Metacestodes of Gryporhynchid Tapeworms (Cestoda: Cyclophyllidea) from Carp (Cyprinus carpio Linnaeus, 1758) from Mozambique, Africa
Potamonautes gorongosa, a new species of potamonautid freshwater crab (Decapoda, Brachyura) from Mozambique, southeastern AfricaCumberlidge, N.; Naskrecki, P. & Daniels, S.2016


Sofala






Nauplius


A new species of the freshwater crab genus Potamonautes MacLeay, 1838, is described from Gorongosa National Park in Sofala Province, Mozambique, southern Africa. Potamonautes gorongosa, new species, is morphologically and phylogenetically distinct from the other species of Potamonautes found in Mozambique and nearby countries, and is most closely related to Potamonautes mutareensis Phiri and Daniels, 2013, from eastern Zimbabwe. Th e new species diff ers from this species and its other congeners by a unique combination of morphological characters of the fi rst gonopod, the anterior sternum, third maxilliped, and the major cheliped.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Identification, Monitoring, Indicators and Assessments


Gorongosa National Park

Potamonautes gorongosa, a new species of potamonautid freshwater crab (Decapoda, Brachyura) from Mozambique, southeastern Africa
Does the Limpopo River Basin have sufficient water for massive irrigation development in the plains of Mozambique?der Zaag, P. Et al.2010


Gaza






Physics and Chemistry of the Earth


This paper verifies whether the water resources of the transboundary Limpopo River Basin are sufficient for the planned massive irrigation developments in the Mozambique part of this basin, namely 73,000 ha, in addition to existing irrigation (estimated at 9400 ha), and natural growth of common use irrigation (4000 ha). This development includes the expansion of sugar cane production for the production of ethanol as a biofuel. Total additional water requirements may amount to 1.3  109 m3/a or more. A simple river basin simulation model was constructed in order to assess different irrigation development scenarios, and at two storage capacities of the existing Massingir dam.




English


No Restrictions


Inland Waters and Wetlands Biodiversity


Peer-reviewed article


Sustainable Use of Biodiversity


Limpopo National Park

Does the Limpopo River Basin have sufficient water for massive irrigation development in the plains of Mozambique?
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